New January Books

Orphan Train: A Novel by Christina Baker KlineOrphan Train: A Novel

By Christina Baker Kline

Penobscot Indian Molly Ayer is close to aging out out of the foster care system.  A community service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping Molly out of juvenile hall.  As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly learns that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they seem to be.  A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.  Molly discovers that she has the power to help Vivian find answers to mysteries that have haunted her for her entire life answers that will ultimately free them both.

Browse all of this month’s New Large Print Titles.

The Spymistress: A Novel by Jennifer ChiaveriniThe Spymistress: A Novel

By Jennifer Chiaverini

Born to slave-holding aristocracy in Richmond, Virginia, and educated by Northern Quakers, Elizabeth Van Lew was a paradox of her time.  When her native state seceded in April 1861, Van Lew’s convictions compelled her to defy the new Confederate regime.  Pledging her loyalty to the Lincoln White House, her courage would never waver, even as her wartime actions threatened not only her reputation, but also her life.  Van Lew’s skills in gathering military intelligence were unparalleled.  She helped to construct the Richmond Underground and orchestrated escapes from the infamous Confederate Libby Prison under the guise of humanitarian aid.  Her spy ring’s reach was vast, from clerks in the Confederate War and Navy Departments to the very home of Confederate President Jefferson Davis.  Although Van Lew was inducted posthumously into the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame, the astonishing scope of her achievements has never been widely known.

Browse all of this month’s New Nonfiction Titles.

Call Me Burroughs: A Life by Barry MilesCall Me Burroughs: A Life

By Barry Miles

Fifty years ago, Norman Mailer asserted, “William Burroughs is the only American novelist living today who may conceivably be possessed by genius.”  Few since have taken such literary risks, developed such individual political or spiritual ideas, or spanned such a wide range of media.  Burroughs wrote novels, memoirs, technical manuals, and poetry.  He painted, made collages, took thousands of photographs, produced hundreds of hours of experimental recordings, acted in movies, and recorded more CDs than most rock bands.  Burroughs was the original cult figure of the Beat Movement, and with the publication of his novel Naked Lunch, which was originally banned for obscenity, he became a guru to the 60s youth counterculture.  In CALL ME BURROUGHS, biographer and Beat historian Barry Miles presents the first full-length biography of Burroughs to be published in a quarter century-and the first one to chronicle the last decade of Burroughs’s life and examine his long-term cultural legacy.  Written with the full support of the Burroughs estate and drawing from countless interviews with figures like Allen Ginsberg, Lucien Carr, and Burroughs himself, CALL ME BURROUGHS is a rigorously researched biography that finally gets to the heart of its notoriously mercurial subject.

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